Monday, July 29, 2013

Looking for Guest Bloggers and Articles...

For those of you who haven't heard yet, my father-in-law has been fighting cancer for the last year.  Unfortunately, he's fought the good fight but due to masses of blood clots in his head, they cannot finish the job.  So he is now in hospice care at home.  As you can imagine my wife, myself, and our family are devastated and are trying to spend as much time with him as we can.    So I won't be posting as much, but I don't want my readers to be left without much new here.

So I'm offering you all the chance to post articles about writing here on my blog.  Feel free to push a book or books of yours, but please offer some tidbits or story about an aspect of writing and how it affected that particular book(s).   I'm looking for insights into plot, editing, characters, development, rewrites, cover art, publishing, agents, self-publishing, etc.  Again, all I ask is that if your pushing  book, make sure the article connects to it.  

I look forward to hearing back from those who are interested.  And by the way, if you have an old entry from your own blog that fits what I'm looking for and would like to update it or just reproduce it for the audience here, that would be okay as well.  Just let me know.  

Thanks and take care of yourselves everyone.  I'll be posting and keeping you all updated on what's happening with my father-in-law and the family.

Saturday, July 27, 2013

Guest Author Cherley Grogg and "The Secret In Grandma's Trunk"...

On this week's blog I'm proud to introduce author Cherley Grogg, who is about to release her latest children's novel "THE SECRET IN GRANDMA'S TRUNK".  This book will be on Amazon starting July 29th and will be available on Kindle for FREE the 29th-31st.  So please welcome my guest, Cherley.


I’m so glad to have this opportunity to share a little about myself and my children’s novel “The Secret in Grandma’s Trunk”, which is free to download from Amazon for a limited time.   The inspiration for the book came from my grandsons. I have three grandsons and a granddaughter. My granddaughter loves to read, but the boys do not, so I decided to write a book they would love to read. I knew it’d have to have strong kids in it, strong physically and head strong too.  The characters would all have to be realistic with problems and scuffles among themselves, it would have to be fast paced and full of adventure.  Plus my grandsons like sports and girls so I needed to put that in there as well. I couldn’t leave my granddaughter without someone to relate to so I gave the brothers in the story a female cousin who could keep up with them in most things and top them in other things. In addition to the children, there are some strong, funny and interesting adult characters. This book appeals to people of all ages.
                The main character in “The Secret in Grandma’s Trunk”, Brandon is not quiet. He’s very outgoing and loud. He’s a leader and his outgoing boisterous personality works well for him, but not listening also gets him into a lot of trouble. Jordan his cousin is a female version of Brandon, but Jacob his brother is the opposite. He’s a quiet listener, a thinker. The 13 year olds get in a passel of trouble because of not listening, and Jacob quietly follows them.
Here’s the Blurb: A teen's life disrupts when his Great-Grandmother, a stranger comes to live with him and his family. She upsets his life so much that he stoops pretty low to get rid of her, including trying to find a way to get into the oversized trunk she has stored in his garage. Spunky Grandma keeps the key in a special place.
The kids expect treasure, but discover a terrible secret instead, which puts Grandma in danger’s way. Will she turn to her grandchildren for help or to a young ghost?
This is an excerpt from Chapter Fourteen:
Jacob looked astounded. "How in the world did you pull that off?"    
             "A girl has to have stuff." She grinned. "You know girl's stuff."      
              "No, we don't know, and we don't want to know. The important thing is you got the card." Brandon reached for the credit card.  
               "I want to know," Jacob said.    
               "Believe me, you don't want to know," Jordan laughed as she handed the card to Brandon. "Hurry up. I need to get Dad's card back to him before Mom's out of the shower."
                In the next chapter the kids went to play soccer. Grandma went with them. Here’s an excerpt from Chapter 15:
                Lilly turned to Grandma. "It doesn't matter what she thinks, she's not on our team. I don't know why the coach favors Jordan. Maybe he feels sorry for her. She's so big and clunky."        
               Grandma's eyes flashed, and her little fist doubled up.  Brandon hoped she wouldn't spit. He put his hand on Grandma's shoulder. "Let's go."                          
 "I'll go, but I want her to know that Jordan sure is big.   She has a big heart, and a big personality, and she's twice the lady that girl is. She would never put someone else down to try to make herself look better."    
  "I don't need to put her down to make myself look better. I always look good."    

  Grandma turned her head and spit.

“The Secret in Grandma’s Trunk” is free from Amazon; I hope you will enjoy it.
 Free on Amazon-limited time


Join me on my Facebook Fan Page:

Cherley's Books are listed below and on sale at Amazon and local bookstores. 


"The Secret in Grandma's Trunk" This is an especially good book for your Tween Children and 
Grandchildren.
And please join me on my Facebook Fanpage, that's managed by one of my most faithful fans: Cindy Ferrell

Here's a link to Cher’ley’s  WEBSITE

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Sometimes You Got To Keep It Simple...

I've been on a writing roll recently with novel #2 "THE SHIP".  I mean I got some serious wordage down, like over 10,000 words in a couple of days, which I thought was impressive.  But then it happened...  I hit a wall.  Not literally of course, just figuratively.  My story suddenly ground to a halt and I had no idea how to get out of the corner I'd put myself in.

Sometimes, writing can be like going through a maze.  You go straight, come to a junction turn right, go a ways, make a left, straight, another left, etc. and you really feel like you're making progress.  In fact, you'll be out of this thing in no time... then you come to a dead end and you have no idea what went wrong.  Sometimes, you can pull out a hammer and chisel, or a huge drill like Wile E Coyote in the old Roadrunner cartoons and make your own way out.

At first I pulled out the ACME Super-Atomic Laser Drill to get out of my current dilemma and get the story moving again.  Unfortunately this led to a new problem.   My efforts did not FLOW with the rest of the story.  In fact it felt forced and was throwing the book out of whack.  And it was going to be very obvious to the reader.

So, I chose another route.  I took a few steps back and retraced my path to see how I got into this mess in the first place.  I wound up losing a lot of the word count I had been so proud of, but it was necessary in order to find the problem.  It turned out I was adding in too many characters into the story.  I already had a fair number of people who were already more than adequate and able to fulfill the same function as these newcomers I'd created.  Now I had a choice to make.  Should I be using the new people just to give them a cameo and then have them disappear from this story, in order to use them in a bigger role in another book?  For this had been the plan.  The problem was where I was inserting them.  The timing was all wrong, I was putting them in a the wrong spot.  Furthermore, I had to ask myself, were they really needed at all?

Don't get me wrong, there are times when you may want a character(s) for a cameo in your current work because you plan to bring them back in another work where they will play a more major role.  But you have to place them just right, especially if their role is not critical to your current story.  This is what happened to me.  Where I was placing them in my story, would have logically necessitated their continuing appearance and involvement in the story.  It wouldn't have made sense to just bring them on and then dump them afterwards, especially when they're the parents of one of your two main characters.

So, I looked over the scene where I brought them in and asked myself, how can I simplify things?  Do I have characters available (including my current batch of supporting ones) who can fulfill the same function without causing a major disruption?  The answer was yes.  In fact, the ones I chose actually made the transition to the next scene much easier.  So that's the route I chose.

Now, I know that in real life we meet a number of different people every day, who may or may not play a major part in our day.  But that's different from a book.  In a book, your audience is already trying to keep track of a number of characters you've already created.  It's not always a good idea to overload the reader and expect them to be able to juggle who's who and where they came in.  So little cameos that serve no real purpose can be a problem.

However, if you're laying down a hint of something major to come later in your current story or a future one,, that's different.  But even then, the timing of the cameo must be just right to make that character's cameo memorable.  Plus you may seriously want to give the reader a major hint there is more to this person and we we will be meeting them again one day.  I did this with one of my two villains in "THE SHIP".  He showed up a couple of times in "THE BRIDGE", and the way I did it left my readers fully aware that this was the start of a series and he'd be back.  I got a number of e-mails asking about him after people had read "THE BRIDGE", which let me know I had done a good job.

So sometimes we need to keep things simple, not just for the readers but for ourselves as well.  Make your story enjoyable and easy to follow.  And if you are writing a series, it's good to leave your readers with hints or mysteries that more is to come.  But don't overwhelm them by leaving too many mysteries unanswered at once.  You may wind up confusing or disappointing your readers when you don't follow up on the one they wanted you to explore.  It's important to play fair, remember without loyal readers and fans, you may wind up without an audience.

So be careful about how you load up your story.  Keep it simple enough to follow, without losing the complexities and twists that keep your readers coming back for more.

Until next time, take car and keep writing.

 

Friday, July 12, 2013

Short Story Exercise "Keep The Engine Running"...

Okay gang, I've got something different for you all today.  A writing exercise.  I did one of these a while back and it was well received.  I hope this one will also be as popular.  Sometimes when we're writing, pacing can be an issue.  We have characters who can't (or won't in some stubborn cases) leave a room or a scene which winds up becoming stagnant and boring for the reader.  As writers, it's up to us to keep things interesting with every scene.  Other times we rush through a whole bunch of events within a few pages so things become a mish-mash of actions that might have been better off being spaced out across the entire story instead of clumped together.

So pacing your story becomes very important.  And I found this little exercise to be both a challenge and a lot of fun.  It's called "Keep The Engine Running".  The rules are as follows:

1 - Have two characters in a vehicle, with a destination in mind.  The driver of the vehicle will never get out or turn the engine off at any point of the story.

2 - They must stop 5 times and interact with another person or group of people at each stop.

3 - They will never reach their destination. (You must tell us what happens to prevent this)

4 - The entire story will take place in/or around the vehicle.

Now the people and things they meet will prevent the original characters from reaching their destination.  See how your characters are changed by their encounters and what they learn.  This is a good way to explore and get to know your people a little better.  Below you will find what I created for this exercise.  I hope you enjoy it and get some ideas for your short story.  Make sure you leave comments and even a link to what you create so me and the other readers of this blog can see what you did.  Remember, the idea behind this whole blog is to help each other learn and grow as writers.    Have fun:

KEEP THE ENGINE RUNNING

by Allan Krummenacker

            “Thanks for driving me today Rookie,” my passenger says, “Those damn eye-drops the doc used are going to affect my vision for at least another hour to two.”
            I smile, “No problem Old-Timer.  Glad to help out.”  That earns me a glare that has made many of my fellow officers wilt.  But I can get away with it.  Roy and I were partnered up back in New York City 20 years ago when I was a rookie cop.  A few years after he left the city to become Chief of Police here in New Swindon, he invited me to join him as his second-in-command.  And with all the cops who had seniority over me at the precinct, I jumped at the opportunity.
            “Cracks like that can get you demoted missy,” he growls.
            I can’t resist.  “You know that scowl would be more intimidating it you weren’t squinting to see me clearly.  Besides, if you demote me who will you get to help you keep the rest of the squad in line?”
            He growls and then falls silent for the moment.  Out of the corner of my eye I see him squirm a little.  “Need a pit-stop?” I ask.
            All I get is a grunt, but I know what it means.  So I pull the patrol car over to a nearby restaurant. 
            “Keep the engine running, just in case a call comes in,” he tells me.
            “Like I’d forget to do that,” I reply innocently.
            This time a large smile crosses his craggy face.  “Remind me to go down the list when I get back, Rookie,” he tells me and heads inside before I can respond.  I wait until I see his broad shoulders and iron-grey head disappear through the doors before replying.  “I can name few times you did it too, you old fart!”
            Just then the radio attached to my shoulder crackles making me jump.  For a second, I wonder if I’ve left the microphone open again and he heard me.  Instead it’s just Pam, our dispatcher back at the station, checking in to see how our boss made out at the eye doctor.  I tell her he did just fine and that she can call his wife  to let her know he actually went this time. Men can be such babies about doctor appointments.
            We chit-chat for a while, since there doesn’t seem to be a lot going on today.  She asks about Alex, my ‘Boy-Toy’ as everyone calls him.  I can’t blame them.  I was leaving high school when he was just entering kindergarten. 
“Oh, he’s doing fine,” I tell her. 
“Really?” she replies, then follows up with, “Because when I saw him earlier I could’ve sworn he was walking a little funny.” 
“We got a little enthusiastic last night,” I tell her and leave it at that.
There’s a pause.  Then I hear, “You are one lucky lady, Sarge.  Oops call coming in.  Talk to you later.”   With that the radio falls silent.
“Don’t I know it,” I mutter quietly, trying not to think about the 15 year age difference between me and my love.
But before I can dwell on my romantic life, Roy emerges from the restaurant carrying two coffees and a bag of food.  “Compliments of the house,” he tells me, as he gets back into the car.
      “Someone trying to get a parking ticket fixed?” I ask checking out the contents of the bag, hot sandwiches and pastries.  Nice.
           “I don’t operate like that and you know it, Sergeant,” he tells me stiffly.  But I can see the amusement in his eyes.  We cap on each other all the time, like a couple of teenagers.  But only when we’re alone, we’re careful not to do it in front of anyone else.  We can’t afford to lose that air of authority.
            I back the patrol car out of the parking lot and get us back on the road.  The station is only about 10 minutes away and we can eat more comfortably there.
          We get about 2 blocks down the road when I see a slender, blonde-haired man walking along the sidewalk.  I instantly recognize his backside, since I’ve grabbed it enough times.   A smile crosses my face as I consider whether or not to hit the siren and give him a little scare.  But before I can decide, Roy grabs a bullhorn from under his seat and rolls down his window.  “All right Hill, hold it right there and keep your hands where I can see them,” he barks and then tells me to pull over.
            Suppressing a grin I do as I’m told. 
          The pedestrian in question has already come to halt and even dropped to his knees, while putting both hands on his head.
            “Oye I ain’t done nuthin’,” he complains in a fake cockney accent.  “I weren’t no where’s near that crime scene, I wasn’t.”
            Towering over him, Roy growls, “Which one was that then?”
           My boyfriend looks up at him and suddenly stands up saying, “Oh well if you haven’t found out about it yet, then I got nothing to worry about.”  His British accent isn’t quite so thick now, nor is it Cockney.  Born and raised for the first part of his life in England, Alex has never lost that way of speaking.  But occasionally he loves to amuse everyone by using some of the other accents from his place of birth, just as a New Yorker may fake a Texan accent over here.
            “I’ve still got a bone to pick with you,” Roy tells him with annoyance.
            Alex glances over at the patrol car and sees me.  A wicked grin crosses his face.   I shake my head.  He’s about to get smart with my boss, and my hearing is very sharp.  So I get to hear everything.
“Oh do you now Chief?  Tell me, will it get me tossed in the back of the patrol car?  And if so, can you throw your driver back there with me?  She’ll get a confession out of me in no time.”
I feel my face turning as red as my hair.  At 45 I certainly don’t look my age.  Many people mistake me for being in my mid-30’s, which is how I landed up with Alex who just turned thirty last month.  We’ve been together three years now and he’s even more devoted to me in spite of our age difference.
Now I’ll admit, I’ve kept myself in good shape.  You have to when you’re a cop otherwise the bad guys take advantage of it and get away.  So my figure still turns heads fairly often.  Maybe that’s one of the reasons why he loves me so passionately and frequently.  He’s always seems more than willing to prove it by getting me out of my clothes.  Sometimes he doesn’t wait even that long. 
            Not that I’m complaining, I feel the same way about him.  But how long can it last?  How soon till he starts noticing the first hints of lines around my eyes, or that I’ve gotten my first grey hair?  What then?
            Knowing him, he’ll probably propose again.  God he’s wonderful.
          Meanwhile I can still hear Roy raising his voice outside the car.  Apparently it was my Boy-Toy’s fault that he had to see the eye doctor today.
            “All I said to your wife was that you were complaining that you were having trouble reading reports lately,” my love explains.
            “Yeah well next time keep MY complaints to yourself, all right?” Roy tells him and climbs back into the patrol car.  I can see Alex standing on the sidewalk with the most puzzled look on his face.  I can’t blame him.  How do you keep someone else’s complaints to yourself?  I’m tempted to ask Roy but he’s already buckled up and telling me to get going. 
            I blow a kiss to Alex and take off. 
            We go another couple of blocks only to be stopped by a traffic light.  I hate this particular one.  It’s the slowest one in the whole damn town, or at least it feels that way. And since there are two lanes going each way, whoever pulls up next to you will naturally roll down their window wanting to talk to you.  And today is no different.
            Off to my left I hear and engine roar like someone wants to race.  I turn and see my current partner Steve Patell on his motorbike. Even with the helmet and sunglasses, his big moustache is unmistakable.  He’s grinning at me now and revs the engine again.  Apparently he hasn’t seen who’s in the car with me.  I roll down my window. 
            “Hey, cut that out or I’ll site you for noise pollution,” I yell to him.
            “You and what army, Sarge?”
            I can’t resist.  I lean back and let him get a good look at our boss who’s glaring at him.
            The smile disappears from Steve’s face faster than you can say “Book ‘em Dano!” 
            A car behind us beeps.  The light’s changed and my partner is already taking off.  Not too fast, but enough to stay out of reach for the moment.  He knows he’s going to get chewed out at the office.  Poor guy, I almost feel sorry for him.  But then again he keeps dropping hints for me to dump my Boy-Toy and take up with him.  Like that’s ever going to happen.  He’s only a few years older than Alex.  What is it with me attracting younger men?  
            “Patell would make a great cop if he’d stop horsing around so damn much,” Roy grunts. 
         “He gets along good with the high school crowd,” I point out, coming to my partner’s defense.  It doesn’t help though.
          “They like him because he never grew up.  He’s got the same mindset as they do,” Roy replies, staring straight ahead.
          I can tell further defense of Steve will only result in more annoyance so I decide to let things drop.  Roy has a point, but so do I.  My partner and I get along really well with over 90% of the high school crowd here in New Swindon.  And they are willing to come to us with problems, especially when they’re afraid to turning to Mom and Dad.  Which makes sense since all we can do is talk them to death.  Their parents can ground them.
            For the next five blocks Roy goes on and on about the importance of keeping up a good appearance and authority.  We’ve just turned down a residential street and I spot Frank Marshall, one of the town’s older residents struggling with his groceries. 
            I pull over and Roy gives me a look but doesn’t say anything.  After working together for so long, he can read me like a book.
            “Keeping up appearances, huh?” he growls. 
            I smile innocently at him..
         “Keep the engine running,” he mutters and gets out.  As soon as the door closes he pops his head through the open window.  “And for your information I was going to tell you to stop anyway.  He and I are supposed to go fishing this weekend.”
            I frown, “And who’s going to be minding the station?”
          “You, you snot-nosed Rookie,” he grins evilly.  “That’ll teach you to be a smartass,” he adds and then disappears.
          My mouth hangs open.  Damn him, I was hoping to spend a good part of Saturday in bed with Alex.  Now it’ll just be Friday.  Sunday we’ll be going over to New Haven to be part of a Ballroom Dance exhibition. 
            I watch Roy with Mr. Marshall and the two of them are having a grand old time talking.  ‘Gee, I can hardly wait to hear the stories about the ones that got away,’ I think drily.   
            The rest of my musings are cut off as Pam’s voice comes over the radio..  A car’s been stolen and a chase is already under way.  The vehicle isn’t too far from here. 
          I pop my head out the window and tell Roy what’s up.  Within seconds he’s back in the car and telling me to hit the sirens.  We take off. 
            I give him the full run-down on what’s happening and he grabs the microphone to help coordinate the pursuit.  Roy knows every street in and around the town.  You don’t stay Chief of Police for over twenty years without knowing your territory.  He tells me where to turn and within moments we’re right behind the stolen car.   It’s a metal blue Impala. And from what I can see of the driver’s head, it looks like they might be on something.
            “Terrific,” I mutter, “a stoner going for an afternoon joy-ride.”
          “Probably headed for a Chop-Shop,” Roy grunts.  “We’ve been getting reports about one over in Canaan.”
           “That’s just over the state line,” I point out.  “If he takes the next right, that’ll put him on Route 44 and he’ll only be about 10 miles from it.”
            “I know,” Roy nods and tells me to keep close.  “Just keep on his ass.  The Chief over in Canaan’s already got a welcoming party waiting for him if we can keep him busy.”
            I floor it and we get right up to the Impala’s bumper.   This makes the guy nervous and he takes the right onto 44 just as planned. 
          We stay right behind him.  In this area, the road is only one lane each way.   So there aren’t many places our friend can go.  But it gets twisty in some areas, and we’re coming up on one of the bends. 
            The car thief is definitely on something.   He almost doesn’t make the curve.  With tires screaming he winds up compensating too much and swings over into the opposite lane before righting the car.  I don’t have that problem. 
         “Keep on him, Ronnie.  He’s going to have to slow down and pull over, or do something really stupid,” Roy tells me absently, as he leans forward in his seat.  It’s obvious he’s totally loving this chase.  That’s one of the great things about him.  He’s never been one of those people who enjoys being behind a desk all day.   Getting out on the street, meeting people, taking the pulse of the town, that’s the way he likes to run his station.  And it works.
            We’re almost on top of the Impala again when the guy suddenly swings over to the left lane.  Luckily there’s no oncoming traffic. 
          “Shall I give him a tap?” I ask Roy, hoping to force the guy over or spin him out before someone comes along and gets hurt.
            But before my boss can answer the guy suddenly swings back into our lane, and the front end of my patrol car.  Both our cars start to spin out.  It happens so fast I don’t have enough time to avoid the ditch on the side of the road. 
            The next thing I know the world through the windshield flips over amidst a loud thunderous crash. 
            It takes a few seconds for my vision to clear and I see the world outside it upside down.  Luckily I don’t feel any pain.   I look over at Roy who seems to be okay too.  He grins at me and pats the built in roll-bar above our heads.  Without it, we probably would’ve been crushed.  Carefully we get our seatbelts undone and manage to crawl out through the side windows. 
           Getting to our feet we see the Impala wasn’t as lucky.  It flipped a couple of times before landing right-side up.  However our friend who led us on this merry chase wasn’t wearing his seatbelt and got ejected.  We find him a few yards away from where his stolen prize landed up.  Miraculously, he’s just got a few bruises and a cut on his forehead. 
            We put he cuffs on him and call for back up using our shoulder radios. 
           A noise in the background catches our attention.  Turning around we see the patrol car’s back wheels are still spinning.  Roy gives me a look.

           I shrug and say, “Hey, you told me to keep the engine running.”

Sunday, July 7, 2013

Thoughts On Free Giveaways and 99 Cent Specials...

Well, as you all know last month I did my first free promo on Amazon, where 400 people snatched up their own Kindle copy of my paranormal/mystery "THE BRIDGE".    Now, one of the things that inspired me to take that risk was the fact that I'd read in many different articles and blogs, that such a promo could help actual paying sales.  Those who grabbed a copy start spreading the word about how much they liked the book and tell others to get their own copy.  I can safely say, I've seen a slight increase in the number of actual purchased copies of the book, but nothing astronomical. 

So this last weekend I did a special .99 cent promotion which netted about 5 or 6 sales total and that's all.  Now a number of you may be thinking, "Wow, that wasn't very impressive."  And you'd be right.  But, it's about what I expected because, "THE BRIDGE" is my first book.  I'm still an unknown author.  I did try and foster a following in advance and build up anticipation and interest in the book and look at the total results.  To date, about 500 copies of my book are out there, which to me is rather impressive for a first timer.  The book has been garnering mainly 4 and 5 star reviews, 13 on Amazon and 15 on Smashwords.  Now only 3 of those reviews came after the free giveaway.

That might sound discouraging to some people, but I'm not looking at it that way.  When you do a free giveaway, most people are loading up their Kindles with books that they will eventually read.  A lot of those people who downloaded my book, still haven't had a chance to read it yet.  I know this, because a number of them have told me this is the case.  They message me and to say, 'You're number ( ) in my reading list, but I'm looking forward to your book and getting back to you about it afterwards.'  

So, I have reason to hope for more reviews and that these folks will be so excited by what I've done, they'll not only be dying to see the next installment (which is something I keep hearing from those who have read "The Bridge").  But I'm also hoping they're going to be spreading the word about it and the upcoming sequel to all their friends and networks, which will in turn translate into more sales.  

Remember when it's only your first or second book, you're still building a fan base which takes time and patience.

Now, I do plan to do one more free giveaway on Amazon sometime in August, before my exclusive KDP Select contract expires.  Once it does expire, I'm bringing "THE BRIDGE" back to Smashwords, Nook, Apple and other e-readers.  I've already had a number of inquiries of when the book will be available in those formats, so I've still got more prospective customers to come.

On the other hand, I do have one concern and that is, "Have I hit my limit of possible customers in my current "sphere of influence?"  I'm always interested in getting the word out about my book out to more and more people, but I'm starting to run low on ideas of how to make that happen.  I've done LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, Goodreads, press releases, contacted radio and newspapers (with minimal results on these two but I'm still trying).

So, if any of you have suggestions, please leave them down in the comments section for me and other readers to learn from.  Remember, we're all in this writing thing together and one of the main purposes of this blog is to share ideas and experiences.  So don't be afraid to share or ask questions.

Until next time, take care and keep writing.

  

The .99 Cent Special Ends At Midnight Tonight...

PLEASE HELP SPREAD THE WORD... There is only until midnight tonight (July 7th, Pacific Standard Time) to get my debut paranormal/mystery "THE BRIDGE" on Kindle at the special price of only .99 cents.

If you or someone you know likes ghosts, horror, psychics and the feel of the Twilight Zone, this is the one you want to have and read in your Kindle. The sequel to this breakout series will be coming in October. So don't miss out.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00B86DR9G



Wednesday, July 3, 2013

****THE 4TH OF JULY CELEBRATION HAS STARTED EARLY****

Starting today, I'm running a 4th of July special. From now until midnight Sunday July 7th, you can get the Kindle version of my paranormal/mystery "THE BRIDGE" for just $0.99 cents.

Ghosts, psychics, police, and a centuries old mystery await you within the pages of book one in the Para-Earth Series which has garnered 4 and 5 star reviews. Get your Kindle copy at Amazon by clicking the link below.

And if you've already gotten a copy, share the link and the special with others so they can take advantage of this limited time offer. Happy 4th of July all everyone, and stay safe!