Sunday, February 7, 2016

Update On My Collaboration Project...

As you may recall, a while back I revealed that I had begun not one but two collaboration projects.  One is with my wife Helen and the other is with my high school friend and author Rich Caminiti. Working with my wife has not been a problem since she's always been my confidant, science advisor, etc.  

But working with an old friend like Rich... that presented me with some challenges that both thrilled and worried me.  


The biggest concern I had was the fact that he looks to me for guidance in many ways since this is his first full-fledged novel, whereas I already have two under my belt.  He had tried one before but due to the fact that it involves time-travel and altering an individual's personal history, it presented him with a lot of issues that he is still working out.  I've seen the early versions and I think the story has a lot of potential and will be a great read when the time comes.  But before going back to it, he wanted to try his hand at another writing project first, to get more experience and knowledge about the process of creating a novel and getting story-line worked out into a logical and easy to read format.

In some ways I found being in the role of a mentor as well as co-author a little daunting, but I've known him for so long that I trusted in both of us to come to agreements and be open to each others ideas and suggestions.  However, we can both be almost too agreeable, which presented pitfalls of another kind such as trying to fit too many ideas into one story and the main plot becomes muddied and convoluted.  

Luckily, this has not been the case.  We talk every week and discuss ideas and really give a lot of thought to each one to see if it can actually fit into the main story.  If the idea doesn't fit, we'll work and rework it until it does fit or set it aside for another story entirely.  (Remember that file folder I keep on my computer where discarded ideas go, that's where they land up.  Just because the idea doesn't work here, it can work elsewhere or even be the basis for a brand new story.)



As for where Rich and I are at right now, the above image gives you an idea of our thought processes. We have plenty of ideas and red-herrings to throw at the audience, but also a solid progression to the final climactic scene.  

So what is our project?  It's a paranormal/historical piece which begins in a snowy winter in 1846 and culminates in a dangerous race against time to thwart the most diabolical plot to cripple the Union Army in 1863-4.  No, you won't find Abraham Lincoln fighting werewolves or General Grant taking on rampaging hordes of zombie leprechauns (Yeah, I know that last one is pretty far out there but some of the things that Hollywood comes out with sometimes is pretty far out there too, folks).

However it does involve actual historical events and figures, as well as a healthy dose of the supernatural and mythological beings from not one but at least three different cultures.  These cultures include: Native American, Chinese, and even some European mythos.


Yeah, I know it sounds bizarre but I'm being serious here, folks.  Without giving too much away, let me just ask you to think about what was happening in America back in the mid-1800's.  We had an influx of Chinese/Asian immigrants during the California Gold Rush, and the expansion of the railroads.  On the East Coast, we were getting immigrants from Ireland, Scotland, Germany, Italy etc. due to the Great Potato Famine, unstable regimes, and other events.  With all these different cultures coming to America, they brought religion, ideas, food, cultures, etc.  So why not a bit of supernatural concepts or beings as well?  When looked at in that light, the concept is not so far-fetched is it?

However, it took me and Rich several months to reconcile these ideas and actually formulate a solid workable concept that, based on where we were having the story take place, actually works.  We both did extensive historical research on a number of fronts including the Opium Wars in China, events and historical figures involved in the Civil War, Native American tribes located west of the Sierras, as well as San Francisco here in California.  

Sharing what we learned through, weekly Skype sessions, we slowly pieced together how the story we wanted to tell could take place and blend into the time period and connect with the turbulence of the Civil War.  We also drew upon another event from 1846 which led to the title of our project "The Pass".  

This is part of what makes our collaboration work.  Sharing the job of research, ideas, facts, thoughts and hashing things out 'together' to make a cohesive concept.  There is give and take, as well as turning to each other when one of us hits a mental roadblock or cannot see a way forward.  We're there for each other and offer as much support and friendship as possible.  

So that's what collaboration looks like for us.  How far have we gotten with the story and how are handling the writing portion? 

Well stay tuned.  I'm hoping to explore that area in my next installment.  Until then, take care and keep writing everyone.


Friday, January 29, 2016

Damaged...But Not Tainted


Well, my first week of working for the county started out good and ended with a release... from employment.  I had to step down and leave due to a health issue from a previous employer that dogs my every step... Asthma!  Some years ago I worked in a building that had a very bad ventilation system, which even may have contained toxic molds.  


I tried to fight and argue, but the company insisted there was nothing wrong with their system.  "We've had it tested..." I was told repeatedly.  I even asked to see the test results and specifically know what kind of airborne things they had tested for.  They told me that wasn't possible and it was company privilege.  Finally, I was told that if I wanted to get a test done of my own I'd have to pay for it, AND I'd have to get their approval to allow the people who would do the test permission to enter the building in the first place.  

Really fair and independent, right?

At the time I was too sick to fight 'city hall' and wound up leaving.  But the damage to my lungs remained.  I've gotten better with time, but they've never healed completely and probably never will.  

Fast forward to this week.  We began orientation in a building that I had no problem with.  In fact I felt rather safe there.  But the actual training was taking place in another location which I did not enter until yesterday.  My lungs felt itchy, but I figured I would tough things out.  After all I was only supposed to be there for 12 weeks (that's what we were told in orientation).  Unfortunately, reality stepped in and said we'd be there at least 17 weeks, with the strong possibility that after that this building is where we'd be assigned.

Still I kept quiet.  But then we went on a tour and when I reached the areas where we'd be working I felt much worse.  I continued throughout the day in the hopes that maybe it wouldn't be so bad, but those of you with asthma know what it's like.  It doesn't get easier in a place that's triggering you off.  If it had truly been only 12 weeks, I might've been able to stick it out.  I was willing to try, but when I heard this might be were I'd be staying (and no there was not a way to make sure I'd be located somewhere else after the training) I had to make a decision.  

I couldn't risk being stuck in the same type of situation that damaged me in the first place, so today I tendered my resignation.  


As you can imagine, I felt completely lost and gutted by this decision.  I felt like I let so many people down, but what choice did I have.  I spoke with my better half first and she told me to quit.  She could hear the breathing problems over the phone.  

By the end of the day I asked the trainers if this was the only facility where this kind of training took place.  They confirmed that it was and then said, "Why do you ask?  Is there something wrong, you don't look all right."  I told them my problem and they were very sympathetic but explained that indeed their hands were tied.  

So I came home last night and spoke with Helen who told me not to go back.  So this morning I put on my 'big boy' pants and made the phone call to resign.  Now I had a special ID badge that I wanted to get back to them and the person I spoke with told me to take it to office where Orientation had taken place and sign the forms for my resignation.


Well, I braced myself for the experience and went to Personnel and told them the purpose for my visit.  The folks that greeted me were very sorry and asked if I wouldn't mind talking with one of the higher ranking personnel staff.  I agreed and was shown in to an office where a very nice woman sat me down and talked with me about the situation.  She was very sweet and sympathetic and then asked me a particular question that floored me.  It was "Would you want to come back and work with the county again?  In a a different position and location of course?"  

Naturally I gave her a resounding and enthusiastic "YES!"  

She smiled and told me to keep watching the employment board online and if I saw some positions I qualified for, to try for them.  I took this to mean that the fact that I got on with them in the first place, meant that they considered me the kind of person they wanted in their employ.  


I spent the rest of the morning getting myself back to full-time status as a student at the University and so I could get my full financial aid package, as well as preserve our current residence for possibly the summer if nothing else happens on the work front.

Where do I go from here?  Attend classes, try and get something part-time either at the college or nearby and keep putting in applications for State and County work, as well as write.  In short I move forward and keep trying.

At least now I know that I do appeal to employers and can land something.  Parts of me are damaged, but I'm not tainted.  There's no cloud or stain that tells people I'm "Unemployable", and that means a lot.

Until next time, take care and keep writing...

Monday, January 18, 2016

Hey Allan Why So Quiet Lately?


How come no new posts lately Allan?  Have you given up Blogging?  Is everything all right with you?

These are the questions I've been hearing a lot lately, and with good reason.  With the holidays over and I have Winter Break from University, a lot of you were expecting more frequent posts here.  Well, so was I.  But then life got in the way and hasn't stopped yet.  

What do I mean by that?  Well let me take a moment to gather my thoughts and I'll explain...


After my last post, there was of course the holidays to contend with.  Both my wife Helen and I were in heavy demand so naturally I didn't have a lot of time to even think about blogging.  What time I had available to write I spent working on "The Door", focusing on the confrontation scene I mentioned in the last entry.  

However, even that got derailed by events that began shortly after the new year began. I started getting requests for job interviews which took up more of my time as I prepped and primped to make a good impression.  Then early last week, I got an offer with the County of Monterey, which I have accepted.  

DRAMATIC PAUSE:


The job in question is full-time, which of course means I cannot take a full class load at CSU Monterey Bay, which led to a new crisis.  Helen and I live in off campus-housing, which requires I be enrolled as a full-time student.  We don't have the money or resources to move right away, so I had to put together an appeal to allow us to stay where we are until our lease runs out in May, which would put us in a better position to move then as well as still permit me to take a couple of classes. 

I should be hearing an answer on our appeal late this week/early next week.  In the meantime, we've been exploring back-up possibilities of where to move (which would be really stressful and difficult) in the meantime.  

We have some possibilities in mind, but would really rather not be forced to move at this time as I still have to get past the 'Probation Period' with the county.  They could decide I'm not working out and dump me, in which case I'd simply go back to being a full-time student if no other work offers show up.

All this worrying and running around has taken up most of my time this month and I'm simply praying at this point that we'll be given to okay to stay until the end of the lease and not have our lives disrupted even more.  

So keep your fingers crossed for us that things work out and I can settle into the new job and juggle the classes I'm still taking with time for more writing.

I'll post again later this week or early next week with an update, so stay tuned... and keep writing.






Tuesday, December 22, 2015

Finding My Way Back To "The Door"

As you all know, for the past couple of months, I was pulled away from my writing by all the demands of my classes at the California State University of Monterey Bay.  But now all of that is over, until next semester begins late next month/early February when it all starts up again... possibly, things may change before then.  I'm up for a couple of job interviews which could change everything.

In any case, you'd think I would be eager to jump back into my writing right?  Yes and no.  Now don't get me wrong, I'm still in love with writing, but trying to awaken my muse has been hard.  Being away from my writing for so long left me drained emotionally and mentally on the creative front.  Plus there's been other things I had to deal with which also got pushed aside thanks to all the schoolwork.

Luckily a lot of that is done and I have more time to get back to writing, only I found I was stuck staring at "The Door" and not being able to do anything with it.  

(NOTE: This is NOT the final design for the bookcover... still working on it)

Now before anyone mentions plotting, let me explain that I've always known where the final confrontation was going to take place and who'd be there.  I could clearly see each of the characters who needed to be there having their own special moment.  I even knew why they were there, but I couldn't figure out what they'd be doing DURING the fight.  Most of the scenes I was picturing were aftermath moments, or pauses when the action moved elsewhere, so they had to be on hand.  But what were they doing while the action was happening was puzzling me.  

I tried turning it over again and again in my mind only to realize I was once more dealing with a mental version of my old nemesis the Rubik's Cube.  Only this time it was more intimidating than ever before...


I began to feel like I'd never solve this problem.  Again and again I'd start thinking I had the solution, because I could see the goal in the distance.  I'd even make good progress towards getting there, but then I'd find myself hitting another wall.  It was like wandering through the most frustrating maze I'd ever encountered.


Then yesterday, the breakthrough finally hit me.  I needed to work on the final battle FIRST and then let the rest of the story follow.  I had to place every character I wanted into that scene and find out for myself what they could/would/and finally did in that climactic moment.  Only then could I justify to myself as well as the reader, why they needed to be in this story in the first place.  

Now normally I don't usually work this way.  I've always used a loose outline, like in this case, and knew where I was going and led the characters to that moment.  Plus, I still needed to see what that final confrontation was going to look like for myself.



Immediately, I looked back at my own works "The Bridge" and "The Ship" and re-read the final battle scenes for each of them.  I quickly realized I had a tendency to go for some pretty impressive battles, that seemed almost impossible for any person to win.  But that's always been my philosophy in writing.  The more daunting the odds, the more impressive the heroes are for overcoming them.  

I would have to go big for this third installment, but not just in size.  I had to deliver something new and special for the readers.  I'd given them glimpses into some of the Para-Earths where my previous antagonists came from.  This time I needed to show the readers WHY some of these being needed to be kept out of our world!  

At that moment, I knew what I needed to do... it was time to open "The Door" and let the nightmares from one of those other places come through.   With a threat of this magnitude in mind, I now know exactly how important it will be to have "All hands on deck", as well as how to utilize each and every character in that scene.

So there you have it folks, once again I say "There is no one specific to write a story".   We each may have our own special methods of writing, but sometimes even those techniques may not always be enough.  There will be days when we need to discover and add new tools to our already impressive arsenal.  


I'm very eager and excited to get back to the story now.  I know that working that final confrontation is going to make how I continue to write certain characters in earlier sections of the book much easier. I already knew their motivations for the most part, but I suspect I'll have better insight into their personalities because I'll have a more clear idea of just how far their willing to go for their ultimate goals.

Remember everyone, stories can take many paths.  But in the end its the writer to must choose or forge the right one that will best serve the purpose in the end.


Until next time, take care and keep writing.





I





Friday, December 18, 2015

From Novel To Film - When Are Changes Acceptable?

This is a tricky topic to cover, because as with any form of art the old saying of "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder" truly is the rule. Speaking ONLY for myself, it comes down to have characters been cut out?  Were certain scenes reworked to blend into one?  Was the flavor or message of the story lost or enhanced?

Given the holiday season, I decided to focus on one Christmas movie that I consider a true classic, which definitely took some artistic liberties, yet managed to enhance the story in my opinion.  The movie in question is the 1951 version of  "A Christmas Carol" starring the legendary actor Alistair Sims as Ebenezer Scrooge.



Now before I continue, let me assure you all that I have actually read the original story in Mr. Dickens own words many times before and am familiar with what was actually in the novella itself.  And I can safely say his original story was carefully kept intact in this film adaptation.  However, certain additions were made by the producers which for me, enhanced the story and made Scrooge's transition from tight-fisted miser, to a good and generous soul all the more believable.  

The first change I will address was during the visit from the Ghost of Christmas Past, actually a number of the changes took place in this section of the film, but helped make the mood of the piece more poignant.  It is mentioned in the novella, that Scrooge's little sister died giving birth to his nephew Fred, who we meet early in both pieces and his harshly dismissed by his uncle.  Fred even points out that as far as he knows the two have never quarreled and he is continuously puzzled by Scrooge's attitude towards him.  In Mr. Dickens version there is the subtle hint that Scrooge resents his nephew's existence since it meant his sister (who Scrooge dearly loved) lost her life.



In the film the producers added Fran's death scene with Scrooge at her bedside.  In the scene elderly Scrooge sees his younger self leave the room after he believed his sister had passed away and heard his newborn nephew crying.  We see there the anger in his younger self  that is the birth of his resentment.  But after his younger self leaves, Scrooge sees and hears his sister speak once more begging him to take care of and watch out for her son.  Elderly Scrooge is devastated by this knowledge and the scene marks a powerful beginning of his change towards not only his nephew but his own behavior towards the world as a whole.

The producers added yet more past story, by showing us how Scrooge met his partner Jacob Marley as young men, and even further on as their greed made them more powerful men in the community.  But then there was another scene added which takes place shortly after we see Scrooge's former fiancee talking about Scrooge working in his office while his partner lies on his deathbed (this part of the story comes straight from Mr. Dickens work).  


But then the producers added a new scene where we see Scrooge at Marley's bedside, and Marley tries to warn him that they had been wrong in how they behaved all these years.  Naturally, Scrooge does not understand and takes none of his dying partner's words to heart.  This scene actually enhances the original scene of Marley;s ghost coming back to try and warn Scrooge to change his ways earlier in the film.

All of these added scenes help to enhance Scrooge's transformation towards the end of the film, and make Mr. Simms performance of the miser's delight of finding he was still alive and had a chance to redeem himself all the more poignant.


As you can clearly see, for me these changes only enhanced the film and the original story.  Mind you, I am also a great fan of the George C. Scott version as well, which did the novella many great justices, which I may touch on in another entry. 

But for now, I would like to hear your opinions on when is it okay to take artistic liberties with an established piece of literature.  It could be your own work and how you would envision it being turned to film.  We all know that time constraints and costs motivates a lot film-makers so changes are bound to happen.  But if you had a hand in the screenplay, would you allow or make changes or shortcuts, and if so how would you keep the feeling and main plot of the story alive?

I look forward to seeing what you all have to say.  Until next time, take care and as always... Keep Writing!



  

Monday, December 7, 2015

****ANOTHER 5 Star Review for "THE SHIP****

A PAGE TURNER  

5.0 out of 5 stars

ByJohn Maberryon December 5, 2015
Format: Kindle EditionVerified

A good follow up to The Bridge, also by this author. A little slow and moderately confusing at the start with a "Family History" that functions as a prologue but isn't 100% tied into the rest of the story. But other than that it moves along keeping interest and the virtual pages of a Kindle turning.

Cassandra from The Bridge is fully developed as the protagonist and her relationship with Julie, another character from the earlier book is a central feature. Together with a whole host of other characters they battle supernatural forces, some of which are associated with the ones from the earlier book.

While you can read this one without having read it's predecessor, I recommend reading the other one first. If you're into fantasy, paranormal mild horror and a little romance thrown in, you will like this book. I did.


*Available now for just $1.49*

For Kindle click on this link:


For Nook, Samsung, Apple, PDF and other E-readers click on this link:

Sunday, December 6, 2015

Tonight It Begins...

For all those who celebrate this holiday I wish you every joy and happiness...


May the blessings of this season bring you close to those you love, and success in the year to come.


A HAPPY AND BLESSED CHANUKKAH TO YOU ALL MY FRIENDS!

Friday, December 4, 2015

Gift Ideas For Under The Tree

****LOOKING FOR A GIFT FOR THAT PARANORMAL/MYSTERY READER IN YOUR LIFE****



Psychics, ghosts, and beings that are/and are not from this world await you within the pages of these 5-star stories

Signed copies of books I and II in the "Para-Earth" series are just $10.00 each, plus $5.00 shipping and handling anywhere in the United States. (For overseas shipping will be more of course, and will depend on the destination).  These books are trade paperback sized and will look great on any bookshelf.

*I accept Paypal, checks, or money orders*

Just tell me which title(s) you want and if they're to be signed and personalized. (Some people prefer just signed, which is why I ask).

You can contact me by leaving a message below or by e-mailing me at:

allan.krummenacker@gmail.com

Please note: Normal mailing time is 5-9 days, so order soon to get it in time for Christmas.


Tuesday, November 17, 2015

There Are Only So Many Hours In the Day and Only So Much Of Me To Spread Around...

Last time I talked about knowing when to release your book, which also meant knowing when NOT to release your book.  Today I'm here to tell you I'm really glad I am not releasing anything at this time.  Why?  See the image below...


That's me right now.  Last week I had a major mid-term for Pre-Calculus, which is a class I'm still struggling with.  I study more hours for that class and I'm still not fully getting the concepts, so I study even more to try and learn them with only so much success.  I've also got two other classes I have to keep up with, along with doing hours of "Service Learning" which is basically volunteer work over at a local high school.  I have to do write-ups about my experiences at my Service Learning Site as well.  Finally, I'm also working on a major final paper for my third class, so in short I'm running on fumes most of the time.

This week I'm taking two county exams (one in Santa Cruz tomorrow, and then another on Friday for Monterey County).  Plus I've got morning appointments on Tues and Thurs, and I'm doing more Service Learning on Wednesday.  All this is happening around my classes.  



So all of this leads very little... aw hell, I'm not going to lie.  I haven't had ANY time to write or promote anything lately.  And it's not going to get better any time soon.  I may not be able to do any serious writing until shortly before/after Christmas.  

There were a number of people who told me I was making the right decision in not releasing "The Vampyre Blogs - Coming Home" or trying to rush it to be ready.  To you I say, a huge "Thank you!"  You were absolutely right, and I'm glad I didn't push things because I would've either had a nervous breakdown or delivered a very poor product. 

It's been so busy, I've hardly had any time to even think about stories or plot points.  The only thing I've been able to give even the remotest attention to has been the collaboration I'm working on with my friend and fellow author Rich Caminiti.



  We're working on a tale together that involves vampires, the Civil War, and a being from Native American folklore.  An unusual blend, you say?  Well, you're right.  But it's shaping up to be a well crafted tale, in spite of the strange elements we're cobbling together.  For the vampires we're working with are not of western or European stock.  That's all I'll say for now.  

I'll try to keep the posts coming here and focus on aspects of writing and the creative process, but I can't guarantee how frequently they'll show up.  I created this post just to keep you all in the loop as to what's going on with me and why I've been a bit quiet lately.  There's just a few more weeks to the semester, but then the holidays hit.  So I'll be a bit busy with that as well.  But I'll do my best not to neglect any of you or this blog.  

So for now, I'm going to sit here and try to catch up with my thoughts.


As always, take care of yourselves, and keep writing.






Wednesday, October 21, 2015

Possibly The Hardest Part About Publishing A Book Is...

Knowing when to release your book to the public


Every writer, dreams about this day.  The moment your latest work is about to be unleashed.  You've worked long and hard for it and the day has finally come.  You've shed blood (preferably not someone esle's), sweat  (and boy didn't you look hot at that moment), and more than a few tears (I'm not even going to try and make a joke on this one, I know damn well I've shed more than few in frustration, or because I wrote a section that moved me enough to shed them).  So you're all set and ready for your book's release, but in the back of your mind you have to keep asking "Is my work truly ready to be released?" 

Is it?

In my case the answer was a resounding "NOT EVEN CLOSE!"



So, as a result of this fact, I've decided not to release my next work "The Vampyre Blogs - Coming Home" until further notice.

How and why did this happen?  The answer is simple.  In spite of my best efforts I could not give my project the full attention and care it needs to be ready.  For those who don't already know, I am currently attending university over in Monterey, California.  I am currently studying Business Administration, with a focus on Marketing as my goal.  However, there have been ever increasing and demands by my classes which makes giving any attention to my writing, almost impossible at this point and time.  In fact, I'm only third of the way through the 2nd draft of the book.  

Furthermore, I still have to have that draft edited and cleaned up before I can try to locate beta-readers to give me feedback.  Originally, I had hoped to have the book already in their hands at this point, but it didn't happen.  And I';m certainly not going to ask people to sign up at this point, not with the holidays coming hard and fast on us all.  Most folks will have family gatherings to plan for, travel itineraries to arrange and a host of cooking and decorating jobs to do.

Furthermore, there's still one final thing I like to do before declaring a book ready to be released and that is to read it aloud with someone who is a good listener and can hear where there might be an issue with the writing.  This takes a long time to do in my case, because I do it via Skype with my editor.  Even though she's gone over the drafts I've sent and everything looks right, she and I like to read it out loud to each other to make sure everything it reads correctly if someone was doing an audio recording of the work.  
  

An idea that sounded great in my head, or a turn of phrase that both of us thought was really cool, may not come across the same way as planned, which is why we do this.  I know a lot of authors do loud readings of their works and believe me, this may take time but it is TOTALLY worth it.

Why am I so picky about this?  Simple, I released my first novel "The Bridge" too quickly (and had to do subsequent re-releases after a number of errors were discovered).  It was an amateur mistake to make, and even though I was forgiven for it (because, I WAS an amateur at the time) I felt I let myself and lot of others down.  So  I made it my policy to not release a book that has not been thoroughly vetted.  I want people to get their monies worth and be able to enjoy a really nice finished product.

So when is a good time to release your work, some of you may be asking?  Well, here's my answer.  Three to six months after you've got it FULLY finished.  Your cover's ready, it's been looked over for editing issues with a fine-tooth comb, you have a 'Proof-copy' which you've gone through with as keen an eye as possible, etc.  

"Well if I have it all set to go, why wait a couple of months?  Shouldn't I get it out right away?"

Well, that's up to you.  But in my opinion ask yourself some questions.  Is it the right time of year for your story?  Does your tale take place around a holiday?  If  so which one?  Are we getting close to tax season?  If so, you might want to hold off until after everyone's finished stressing because they might need a good read to unwind after all that.  They may not have the time to even give your book a passing glance, much less buy it.

Picking the right moment to release your work can sometimes make or break your sales of the book.  So choose wisely.


I know we're all eager to get our work out there, but sometimes hitting that "Pause" button is necessary for the sake of success.  There might be other issues you forgot to take into account such as, marketing.  What is your marketing plan?  Have you been getting the word out about your project?  Do you have a budget for marketing?  How do you plan to get the most exposure for the book?  Have you been building up a sense of anticipation among prospective readers?  If not, then hit that button.  You're not ready.

I promise to discuss marketing in another entry in the near future.  For now I want to close this entry out with the following.  

My plans for having something published in December at this point is to possibly release a novelette that appeared on one of my other blogs called: "The Vampyre Blogs - Private Edition".  It appeared in six installments, but has never been released as a whole book.  It's a holiday piece that takes place fifteen years before the events in "The Bridge" and involves several characters from that novel, along with my vampyre Nathan.  If I do release that novelette, I will make it available in ALL e-book formats: Kindle, Nook, Sony, Apple, etc.  I might also do a printed version, but I'll want to see what kind of demand there is for it first.

After that, I'm hoping to release "The Door" mid-2016, and finally finish Alex, Veronica, Julie and Cassie's current story arc.  I'm not done with those characters by any means.  I have plenty of stories in mind that will involve them, so don't worry.  As for "The Vampyre Blogs - Coming Home", that will be released around Halloween 2016.  By then it will be in fighting shape, and the time of year will be perfect for a a vampyre story.

I hope today's entry gave you all food for thought.  Timing your release and making sure the product is as good as it can be is crucial to your book's success.  Don't skimp or rush things.  You put a lot of work into that story, so make sure it's in the best shape it can be so it can earn the recognition and praise it deserves.  Until next time, I'll be planning and plotting my own course.  So take care of yourselves and keep writing!


Wednesday, October 14, 2015

The Two Most Powerful Words When It Comes to Writing Fiction...

As you all know I talk a lot about writing and the different aspects of it.  Recently I got to wondering about where it all begins.  Where do most stories originate or come from in the first place?  Naturally the answer is a person gets an idea and starts to explore different avenues with it.  But that wasn't good enough of an answer to me.  I had to ask, where does the idea come from in the first place?    Where does idea get its beginning?  What if...  I began to ask and then stopped.  I'd just found my answer.  


Two little words... that's all it takes for a story idea to be born.  But it doesn't stop there.  Oh no, my friends those two little words keep popping up throughout the writing process.  Time and time again, I find myself asking or thinking those two words as I'm working on scene after scene.  Or if I'm trying to decide which direction to take the story next.  

Ask yourself, how many times do you find yourself wondering who's going to be the love interest for your main character?  What sex is the character going to be?  Who or what is going to be the big obstacle for my protagonist to overcome in this story?  



Basically we find ourselves at crossroads time and again wondering which direction to head in next.  We can ponder these questions for minutes, hours, days or even longer.  Every decision we make with our writing brings us back to asking the same question over and over again...  "What if... I do such and such next..."

"What if..." they're not big words really.  Yet they have so much impact on our writing that it seems almost impossible to even create anything without them being involved at least once.  For me they keep popping up over and over.  They're like old friends who help me move things along when I'm really stuck.  Because those words are so powerful, they help me realize that I don't always have to choose between one of two or three paths.

Instead, I can say to myself, "What if I take things in a totally different direction the reader never saw coming?"

Suddenly I'm off and running again because those two words reminded me that I make the path where the story heads.  My options are not always limited.  They empower me to take the reader to places they never saw coming and hopefully have them cheering as they continue reading.  I don't always like to be predictable in my stories.  I like to make unexpected twists and turns that makes the reader gasp in delight.  When people read my first novel "The Bridge" they thought they were merely reading  horror/mystery story.  They had no idea that I was going to suddenly throw in huge science fiction twist during the final conflict that suddenly changed the entire mood of the piece.  They found themselves thrown into a whole new world of excitement and intrigue, and it was all thanks to the words "What if..." 

What do you think?  I'd love to hear your thoughts on this topic.  Please leave your remarks in the comments section below.

Until next time, take care of yourselves and keep writing everyone.

Wednesday, October 7, 2015

More Insights Regarding Writing In the 1st Person...

I've currently been focusing most of my writing time on revising and editing the 2nd draft of "The Vampyre Blogs - Coming Home".  As I've mentioned in previous blog entries, this is the first time I'm working from the 1st Person Perspective.  What makes this so different from third person, is the fact that the character is the narrator, instead of me just letting readers see inside the heads of the various characters.

 

This time I had to not only get inside the character's head, but I had to do a lot more.  Each character has something special beside their own thoughts and ideas.  They may walk a certain way, have an outgoing personality, or be quiet and shy, which can all be shown by describing how they behave around the other characters.  But there was one thing I really had to learn about them this time that I hadn't really explored as deeply before.  I had to find their voice.


I can safely say this was have been the most crucial  and difficult part of writing the story for me.  Because, even though I created the characters, each of them would be telling the story as seen through their eyes.  In the past, I could tell the story in my own voice.  I simply had to tell their tale, as they told it to me inside my own head.  But this time, it was different.  I was still creating the story, but now I had to do it from a different perspective.  This time I had to get into the character's head and see the world through their eyes.


I already knew their background, ages, likes, dislikes, personality, the way they dressed etc.  After all, I was the writer and director of the piece.  I knew how I wanted my actors and actresses to look and behave and where I wanted them to go and how to get them there.  But this new perspective I had to take on was a bit daunting in some ways.  Why?  Simple.  I wasn't just getting inside the head of just one character...


I was dealing with a crowd of characters, who were each going to get their turn to help tell the story from their own perspective.  An insane idea?  Not really.  It had been done before. After all, those who've read Bram Stoker's "Dracula" got a taste of multiple first person perspectives in the form of letters, diary and journal entries.  I simply decided to follow his lead and try writing my first vampyre story in a similar vein (no pun intended... well, maybe a little).  This was a suggestion my wife made to me when I told her I wanted to do a multiple first-person point of view for the piece, but didn't know how to pull it off.  Luckily, she simply pointed out to me what Stoker had done, and recommended I updated the concept using Blogs, E-Journals/Diaries, and even written ones.  

For every writer, it feels like you're putting on a one-person show, playing multiple roles as you tell the story.  Only this time, I had to come up with different styles of speech patterns for each character.  This meant more than just giving them an accent or something.  I had to really think hard about how the vocabulary of a man who has walked the Earth for the last 160 years, might differ from an everyday person.  Or how two eighteen year old girls may differ in their way of talking and writing about their lives, based on their interests and backgrounds.  Plus, I had to deal with a pastor who is torn about his sins as well as being haunted by years of child abuse.  The list goes on and on.  


As you can guess, it could get quite dizzying at times for me.  But this was mostly because I wasn't used to jumping heads so quickly and thoroughly.  However, as I continued to write and really got to know the characters better, I found it easier and easier to write from their perspective.  Like an actor/actress who is returning to an old role that performed so many times, slipping back into their persona and voice was easier each time.  

This is true for writing in the third-person as well.  But keeping that 'voice' is very important to me, especially when you have a tale being told from multiple points of view via blog and e-diary entries.  Everyone has a 'voice' when they write that's all their own.  Creating those 'voices' can be a challenge at first, but in time you'll find it easier and easier to slip back into it.

Until, next time.  Take care and keep writing.






Friday, October 2, 2015

Always Writing...

Recently I was on one of the buses that I regularly take to get to my university.  As I was riding I was taking in the scenery and smiling to myself.  A girl who had taken the seat next to me noticed and said I must be having a good day.  I responded by telling her I was observing the scenery and thinking about some of the trees.  In particular I drew her attention to the Spanish Moss growing on several of the trees. 


"Is that what's growing on them?  I've heard of Spanish Moss but I never saw it before," she told me.  

I nodded and replied, "Now picture that stuff moving on its own, maybe reaching down and grabbing a someone as they're walking by."

That freaked her out a bit as she looked at me with wide eyes and said, "That's creepy!  You must be into horror movies and such."

At that point I explained that I was an author who had two books out already and a third coming in December.  From there she relaxed and I told her about my Para-Earth Series.  By the time we arrived at the university she said, "I always wondered how writers come up with so many ideas.  You must be thinking about stuff all the time."

Smiling I said, "That's true.  Even when I'm not physically writing, I'm always writing."  As soon as I said this I started really thinking about what I'd just said and realized how true it was.  

While I can't speak for other writers, I can safely say that no matter what I'm doing at any given time my mind is always pondering story plots, new characters, places, what if situations, you name it.  I could be bowling....


And find myself thinking about what goes on behind the scene where the machinery is gathering up the pins and resetting them.  (Note: I have actually been behind that area thanks to my older brother Ernest who worked on the machines.  He took me back there with him a few times to show me what he did)  After thinking about it, I pictured various scenarios like when the pins are brought down by the machine, what if a human arm was set upright among them?  Or what if the machine where your ball comes back instead you get around bomb with a fuse lit. What would you do?  How did it get there?  What's going on?

Other times I could be wandering among the trees and just listening to the sounds of the leaves rustling under my feet.  I also try to make a mental note of what the air smells like at that moment and how peaceful the area is around me.  In moments like that, I'm trying to take a mental photo of  everything I'm seeing and feeling, so I can try and rebuild it with words for a scene in a story.  And then I find myself asking what might happen in such a scene?  Will a unicorn show up among the trees?  Or will a strange little figure appear from inside a tree and start talking to one of the woodland animals or a child who happens to be in the neighborhood.


Ideas sometimes come when you least expect it.  Even when you're just kicking back and maybe shooting a game of pool to pass the time, a thought or an image may come that sets your mind on fire. Sometimes it might even be the atmosphere of your surroundings that may be the spark that sets you mind alight with ideas and possibilities.  


As writers, our minds are always working on ideas or stories, even when we're not aware of it.  And i find this idea to be a great comfort to me.  There are times when the old "Writer's Block" comes to visit and I find myself staring at my computer screen for hours or even days.  I want to write something but nothing comes.  On days like that I'll try working through the block, or exercising, or bouncing ideas off other people... all to no avail.  

But then I'll decide to get out and about for a while.  Sometimes I'll go to a mall, or do some shopping, or wander down by the beach.  I don't always find the answers I'm seeking and after a while may even stop trying.  However, I do so knowing that sooner or later, something is going to fire my imagination up and I'll be ready to get back on my computer and finish the story I'd been working on.  Why?  Because I'm always writing... even when I don't realize it.  I hope the same is true for all of you.  


Until next time, take care and keep writing everyone!


Tuesday, September 29, 2015

My Review of Peter Straub's "Ghost Story"...


With the coming of Halloween, I've been in a mood for scary books.  So today I decided to pull out one of my favorites and do a review on it.  This was the first novel I read by Mr. Straub, but it got me hooked.  I've read a number of his other works and he has yet to keep me entertained and enthralled....



"What's the worst thing you ever done?"

"I won't tell you, but I'll tell you the worst thing that ever happened to me..."

These are the words that set the "The Chowder Society", four elderly men who've known each other since they were young, into telling each other ghost stories. They've all known each other since their youth, when they were wild and reckless. Friendship and loyalty binds, them along with dark secret from those past days. 

They tried to bury that secret and forget it, but some things don't want to be forgotten. Sometimes, they also want... revenge!

"Ghost Story" is NOT a fast read. In fact it seems to plod along at times... HOWEVER, there is a method to the author's madness. Everything he gives us serves a purpose in the story. 

Furthermore, his pacing and many references are reminiscent to classic ghost stories from long ago. Spine-chilling and haunting the story catches the imagination and refuses to let go.

However, it's not a short easy read. Mr. Straub has a lot of material to throw at us but does so in a manner that builds suspense and terror.

This is a brilliant piece of writing that is thoroughly worth a read. Just don't expect to be taken on a thrill-a-minute joyride. Like it's elderly protagonists, the story moves a slow and steady pace, but it draws you in deeper and deeper as it goes. Soon you'll find yourself wanting more and more as the various pieces and "ghost stories" start coming together, leading to terrifying encounters that build up to a mesmerizing climax.

My only beef with the story the first time I read it was the prologue which is longer than I would normally like to see. But as I said earlier, Mr. Straub links everything he presents us into one tidy and creepy package. Nothing he gives the reader is wasted, so I can forgive him for the lengthy prologue. This is still a 5 star read! 

So come and meet The Chowder Society: The respectable Doctor John Jaffery, the randy Lewis Benedict, the respectable Sears James, and the faithful and easily overlooked Ricky Hawthorne. These men are not your usual run of the mill 'action-heroes', but they will take on an evil unlike anything you've ever read before.